Heavy Jets are a fantastic way of traveling to most long haul cities non stop. With many heavier jets offering seating from 20 - 525 people, in certain configurations they also provide comfortable beds, an aft lavatory and a full front galley. These jets offer the most unique private travel experience we have to offer. 

Thanks to increased performances from these aircraft, it is possible to fly directly from Moscow to Boston or London to Delhi for example.

 

A320-200

A320-200

Base: Middle East

Airbus 320 is a single-aisle aircraft designed for comfort and operating economy on short- to medium-haul routes with 177 seats of economy class. It is an ideal solution for commercial charter flights with typical seating of 150 passengers (2-class) and up to 180 passengers (1-class).

 

A340-200

A340-200

Base: Middle East

The Airbus A340 is a long-range, four-engine, wide-body commercial passenger jet airliner developed and produced by Airbus. The A340 was assembled at Toulouse, France. It seats up to 375 passengers in the standard variants and 440 in the stretched -600 series. Depending on the model, it has a range of between 6,700 to 9,000 nautical miles (12,400 to 16,700 km; 7,700 to 10,400 mi).

The A340 is similar in design to the twin-engine Airbus A330 with which it was concurrently designed. Its distinguishing features are four high-bypass turbofan engines and three-bogie main landing gears.

A330-200

A330-200

Base: Middle East

The Airbus A330 is a medium to long range wide-body twin-engine jet airliner made by Airbus, a division of Airbus Group. Versions of the A330 have a range of 5,600 to 13,430 kilometres (3,020 to 7,250 nmi; 3,480 to 8,350 mi) and can accommodate up to 335 passengers in a two-class layout or carry 70 tonnes (154,000 lb) of cargo.

The A330's origin dates to the mid-1970s as one of several conceived derivatives of Airbus's first airliner, the A300. The A330 was developed in parallel with the four-engine A340, which shared many common airframe components but differed in number of engines. Both airliners incorporated fly-by-wire flight control technology, first introduced on an Airbus aircraft with the A320, as well as the A320'…

Boeing 737-800

Boeing 737-800

Base: The Middle East

New-technology Blended Winglets, which are available on the 737-700, -800 and -900ER, further boost performance. The 8-foot (2.4-m)-long wingtip extensions enhance range, fuel efficiency and take-off performance while lowering carbon emissions, engine maintenance costs and noise.

The Next-Generation 737 models fly approximately 3,000 nautical miles (5,500 km), an increase of up to 900 nautical miles over earlier 737 models. This increases 737 route capabilities throughout the world. The 737-700ER equipped with nine auxiliary fuel tanks has a maximum range of 5,785 nautical miles (10,710 km).

Embraer EJR145

Embraer EJR145

Base: The Netherlands

The Embraer ERJ 145 family is a series of twin-engine regional jets produced by Embraer, a Brazilian aerospace company. Family members include the ERJ 135 (37 passengers), ERJ 140 (44 passengers), and ERJ 145 (50 passengers), as well as the Legacy business jet and the R-99 family of military aircraft.

The ERJ 145 is the largest of the group. Each jet in the series is powered by two turbofan engines. The family's primary competition comes from the Bombardier CRJ regional jets.

Fokker 100

Fokker 100

Base: The Netherlands

The Fokker 100 is a low-weight, 100-seat jetliner uniquely suited to generate high profit on routes too costly for larger equipment. This trend setting jet offers your customers all the comforts and convenience to satisfy their high expectations.

Low operational costs and scant competition in the 100-seat short-range class led to strong sales when it was introduced in the late 1980s, but sales fell as competition increased. Production ended in 1997 with 283 airframes delivered. In July 2012, 156 Fokker 100 aircraft remained in airline service with 30 airlines around the world.

Yak 42D

Yak 42D

Base: Ukraine, Odessa

The Yakovlev Yak-42 is a 100/120-seat three-engined mid-range passenger jet. It is the first airliner produced in the Soviet Union to be powered by modern high-bypass turbofan engines.

It was intended to be a replacement for the Tupolev Tu-134 jet as well as the Ilyushin Il-18, Antonov An-24 and An-26 turboprop airliners. While the new airliner was required to operate out relatively small airfields while maintaining good economy, as many Soviet airports had been upgraded to accommodate more advanced aircraft, it did not have to have the same ability to operate from grass strips as Yakovlev's smaller Yak-40. The requirement resulted in the largest, heaviest and most powerful aircraft designed by Yakovlev so far.